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ENC1102 Dwyer: Plagiarism

Plagiarism Resources

Plagiarism & Citation Lesson

Primary Source

Chopin, Kate. “The Story of an Hour.” English Composition II, Indian River State College Libraries, 2019.

Secondary Source

Hicks, Jennifer. "The Story of an Hour." Short Stories for Students, vol. 2, Gale, 1997, pp. 263-277. Gale Literary Sources, https://link-gale-   

               com.db12.linccweb.org/apps/doc/CX2694900026/GLS?u=lincclin_ircc&sid=GLS&xid=aae49184.

Some of Chopin’s short stories were rejected for publication on moral grounds, for editors perceived in them an unseemly interest in female self-assertion and sexual liberation. Per Seyersted, Chopin’s biographer, writes in his introduction to The Complete Works of Kate Chopin, Volume 1, that the “reason why editors turned down a number of her stories was very likely that her women became more passionate and emancipated.” Given that “The Story of an Hour” was published in 1894, several years after it was written, we can comprehend the importance of moral grounds as a basis for rejection. Marriage was considered a sacred institution. Divorce was quite rare in the 1800s and if one was to occur, men were automatically given legal control of all property and children. Even the constitutional amendments of 1868 and 1870, granting rights of citizenship and voting, gave these rights to African-Americans not women. Women were not granted the right to vote in political elections until 1920. Obviously then, a female writer who wrote of women wanting independence would not be received very highly, especially one who wrote of a woman rejoicing in the death of her husband. The fact that she pays for her elation with her life at the end of the story is not enough to redeem either the character or the author.

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