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MLA Style Guide, 7th Edition: Publication Date

This is a guide for MLA Style. It is based on the Modern Language Association of America's MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, Seventh Edition.

Publication Dates in Works Cited List

Books

For books, use the year of publication in the citation. The date (year) follows the publisher name preceded by a comma. If the year does not appear on the title page, look on the verso page (the back of the title page). Usually, the latest copyright date is cited.

Example:

New York: Scribner's, 2001.

Chicago: U of Chicago, 1999.

For republished books, give the original publication date, followed by a period, before the publication information. Include the most recent publication date after the publisher name.

Example:

Holier, Denis, ed. A New History of French Literature. 1989. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1994. Print.

 

Journals

In general, the date used in a scholarly journal citation will be the year of publication (in parenthesis). Do not include the month or season.

Example:

Gregory, Marshall. "Curriculum, Pedagogy, and Teacherly Ethos." Pedagogy 1.1 (2001): 69. . . . . . 

 

Magazines

For magazines published every month or every two months, give the month(s) and year. Abbreviate the months (except May, June, and July). [Do not give volume and issue numbers].

Environment Apr. 2000: 17-21.

Tikkun Nov.-Dec. 2007:27+.

For magazines published every week or every two weeks, give the complete date - day, month, year. Abbreviate the months (except May, June, and July). [Do not give volume and issue numbers].

Publishers Weekly 27 June 2006: 7-13.

 

Newspapers

For newspapers, give the complete date - day, month, and year. Abbreviate the months (except May, June, and July). [Do not give volume and issue numbers].

New York Times 20 July 2006, early ed. . .

Wall Street Journal 4 Dec. 2009: C1+. . .

 

No date

When no publication date can be found, use n.d. (for no date) in the citation.

Example:

New York: U of Gotham P, n.d.

When you approximate the date, but are uncertain about the accuracy of the information, add brackets around the date and a question mark.

Example:

New York: U of Gotham P, [2003?].