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Council on Instructional Affairs Learning Resources Standing Committee LIS2004 Curriculum Committee

Committee Charge

The Council on Instructional Affairs Learning Resources Standing Committee seeks to replace the existing LIS 2004 curriculum with totally new content reflective of current pedagogy and the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. The new committee will replace all of the LIS statewide curriculum committees.

Background: 

LIS 2004 began in 1997 as a Learning Resources Standing Committee project to develop a statewide one-credit, web-based course which would teach basic Internet research skills. The original charge to the course development committee was to develop a credit course to provide students with the necessary skills to use the Internet as a supplemental resource in the community college library. The course would also enforce library instruction efforts to teach basic research strategies and to introduce students to the Internet, online library catalogs and online databases. The LIS 2004 Course Revision Committee is charged to revise and update the course content. The Course Revision Committee reviews all course materials and makes decisions on recommended course revisions. The LRSC Standing Committee submits these recommendations to the CIA LRSC Chair for final approval.

Scope of work should include but is not limited to:

  1. Suggest new title and new course description
  2. Re-conceptualize curriculum through a review of the literature and best practices, as well as Framework research  
  3. Review and refresh learning objectives
  4. Follow Understanding by Design (UbD™) planning approach
  5. Scaffold the course using a tiered approach
  6. Use ACRL Framework and Threshold Concepts to inform content and lesson structure
  7. Institute review checkpoints from larger community of peers and CIA LRSC using focus groups, surveys, etc.
  8. Include student assessments throughout the curriculum
  9. Design a curriculum that flows for full course appeal that connects and builds upon previous lessons for student success with college research assignments, but has the ability for CMS lessons to be embedded into courses or used for single instructional sessions.
  10. Design the course for quality reflecting current best practices in online and blended learning, e.g., Quality Matters, iNACOL, etc. 
  11. Allow for local flexibility with curriculum
  12. Provide links to peer-reviewed resources for instructors to use (future)
  13. Continue to improve and revise course materials (future)

Curriculum Committee Update for October 5, 2016

The committee has agreed upon a new proposed course title: Research Strategies for College Students.

The committee has agreed upon a new proposed course description: Gain the knowledge, skills, and abilities to succeed in college-level research by identifying, evaluating, and using diverse information sources from the internet and library databases. This course follows the research process that includes developing topics and thesis statements, creating search strategies, and critically evaluating and ethically citing sources. These research and critical thinking skills are crucial for success not only in college but also in the workplace.

The committee has agreed upon a new course learning outcome: Upon completion of this course, students will develop information literacy and critical thinking skills by demonstrating the ability to access, evaluate, use, and cite information efficiently and effectively.

Curriculum Committee Update for February 15, 2017

Since the last update at the end of September, we have accomplished the following:

In October, we used a survey to gather input from librarians at the 28 Florida colleges to create a new course title, description, and learning outcome. The following was approved by a large majority:

Title: Research Strategies for College Students

Description: Gain the knowledge, skills, and abilities to succeed in college-level research by identifying, evaluating, and using diverse information sources from the internet and library databases. This course follows the research process that includes developing topics and thesis statements, creating search strategies, and critically evaluating and ethically citing sources. These research and critical thinking skills are crucial for success not only in college but also in the workplace.                            

Learning Outcome: Upon completion of this course, students will have developed information literacy and critical thinking skills and will be able to demonstrate the ability to access, evaluate, use, and cite information efficiently and effectively.                             

Over the past few months, the committee has reviewed many resources to establish a new course outline. Tallahassee Community College librarians revised the LIS2004 course in Summer 2016 to create new content to better match the frames and reflect new challenges in locating and evaluating sources. Instead of starting with a blank slate, the committee decided to use the new (and somewhat experimental) course as a starting point for developing new content with the understanding that we may need to develop the majority of the course materials from scratch. We each read “Information now: a graphic guide to student research” by Upson and Hall, 2015, reviewed a variety of course materials/tutorials/videos shared via Google Drive, and reviewed the new course materials created by TCC.

Although we have not finalized the learning objectives, we developed a course outline in order to continue moving forward with the course revision. The working outline of the course lesson structure is currently:

  1. Develop research topic and keyword search terms (including concept maps)
  2. Plagiarism awareness and prevention
  3. Discerning among source types/describe the information cycle process
  4. Source evaluation (establishing authority)
  5. Database searching/Boolean strategies/using database tools
  6. Documentation (the value of information)
    1. Final project: annotated bibliography

Each lesson’s working learning objectives have been mapped to the ACRL frames. We will finalize the learning objectives. After finalizing the learning objectives, we will ensure the course content and assessments meet them.

The committee met February 10, 2017. We are continuing to review the materials from the TCC course and elsewhere to determine the content we might keep, what we can use, what we can borrow from other institutions, and what we need to develop. Lessons have been assigned to committee members. Committee members will share their first draft lesson content with the committee before our next meeting. We will review, discuss, and revise the content during our meeting scheduled for February 24th. Particular attention will be paid to lesson continuity and alignment to the frames.

Curriculum Committee Update for June 7, 2017

The following is an update of what the committee has accomplished, is currently working on, and plans to accomplish according to the committee’s charge.

  • New course title: Research Strategies for College Students
  • New course description: Gain the knowledge, skills, and abilities to succeed in college-level research by identifying, evaluating, and using diverse information sources from the internet and library databases. This course follows the research process that includes developing topics and thesis statements, creating search strategies, and critically evaluating and ethically citing sources. These research and critical thinking skills are crucial for success not only in college but also in the workplace.
  • Course level learning outcome: Upon completion of this course, students will have developed information literacy and critical thinking skills and will be able to demonstrate the ability to access, evaluate, use, and cite information efficiently and effectively.
  • Concept of curriculum as based on literature review and best practices, including Framework research: Although we did not conduct a formal literature review, we used a variety of materials (best practice guidelines, lesson plans, textbooks, etc.) to inform our curriculum development :
  • Updated learning objectives: This document outlines all lessons, learning objectives, Frames, content, and assessments.
  • UbD planning approach: The committee began its work last fall by focusing on the learning objectives first, spending a large amount of time on aligning the learning objectives to the Framework and knowledge practices. The learning objectives are clearly stated at the beginning of each lesson and all course content and assessments directly tie to meeting and measuring these learning objectives.  The long term goal of the development of research skills is met by addressing each part of the research process in order.
    • Desired Results: Students will develop Framework-based Information Literacy skills that can be transferred to other courses and used in their personal lives.
    • Evidence: an annotated bibliography of sources as final course project assessment.
    • Learning Plan: See the course outline.
  • Scaffolding:
    • The course is designed to follow an already familiar process of writing a research paper or producing a research-based project (mainly based on skills taught in ENC1101). Students begin with a big idea, narrow it into a manageable topic, and then begin the research process. The course does not follow a task-based approach, but rather a series of lessons that places the student in the center of their research as an engaged consumer and curator of information within a complex “information ecosystem” (ACRL Framework).
    • Some lessons include examples of completed work so that students have clear expectations and another level of instructional support. We felt this was especially important for online learners. For instance, the first lesson requires students to create a Mind Map and a completed sample map is provided and the third lesson requires students to evaluate Google search results for their topic using an evaluation report and a completed report example is provided.
    • Like ENC1101, the course builds on increasingly complex research concepts as the course progresses and content and assessments often refer back to concepts and skills from previous lessons. For instance, in lesson 2, academic integrity and avoiding plagiarism is introduced and then in lesson 6 these concepts are reinforced and put into practice through learning to document sources using APA or MLA style. The final project gives students the opportunity to demonstrate all the skills they have gained in the course.
    • All of the course content is comprised of videos, graphics, charts, and chunked texts to increase overall engagement and to create a familiar and exciting (as exciting as Information Literacy can be!) learning experience. The main goal of scaffolding is to reduce frustration and prevent students from becoming discouraged.
    • Each lesson is preceded by simply-stated learning objectives and each learning activity contains clear instructions and purpose. Some activities are reflection/feedback-based to allow students to express not only their understanding of the material, but also their personal experiences and general observations as the content relates to them.
  • Content informed by ACRL Framework and Threshold Concepts: Karen Kaufmann has been instrumental in leading the committee to ensure that all learning objectives, content, and assessments are aligned with the Framework and threshold concepts. View the alignment document.
  • Reviewed by peers outside committee through focus groups, surveys, etc.: In the fall, the committee distributed a survey to librarians at all 28 Florida colleges (through the library directors) to receive input into the proposed course title and description. We used the feedback to finalize the title and description. Three librarians on the committee are piloting the course this summer at their institutions. These librarians will report any student feedback received and their course success rates. The committee agreed that we will each run a focus group or use a survey with our librarian colleagues at our institutions to solicit feedback on the course using either the PowerPoint slides as the content will be delivered statewide or one of the locally customized, pilot courses. Wendy Dover has created a locally customized version in GCSC’s Canvas LMS and has set it so that all librarians on the committee have the ability to add users as students.
  • Student assessments included throughout curriculum: Each lesson has at least one assessment and the final course project assesses all the skills learned in the course.
  • Curriculum both flows yet has the ability for CMS lessons to be embedded into courses or used for single instructional sessions: The curriculum follows the research process but could be used in chunks for one-shot instructional sessions by focusing on single lessons: topic and keyword selection, database searching, citation formatting, etc. The committee will deliver the course content in PowerPoint slides so that individual instructors and institutions can use the entire course, or portions, as they see fit and customize either individual lessons or the entire course to suit their institutional needs. The committee will be better able to deliver the lessons in one-shot instructional formats after the work on the course as a whole is completed.
  • Course design reflects quality best practices for online and blended learning (e.g., Quality Matters, iNACOL, etc. – please specify): The course is designed to meet the Quality Matters Standards for Higher Education (https://www.qualitymatters.org/sites/default/files/PDFs/StandardsfromtheQMHigherEducationRubric.pdf) and each lesson conforms to the expectations of a well-designed, easily-navigable, and engaging learning experience. A course overview introduction is in place but will change based on each institution’s guidelines. The committee will offer an example “Start Here” folder with content for instructors to adapt to their institution’s needs including welcome/start here text, a sample syllabus, a schedule of activities with a list of each graded assignment and its point value, sample instructor contact information and introduction, and a sample student introduction discussion board post prompt (which adheres to Quality Matters standards and is useful as an attendance assignment in the first days of class). A course level learning outcome was determined and learning objectives for each lesson are clearly stated. These were determined first so that all learning content and assessments teach and measure the learning objectives for each lesson. The instructional materials are broken down into lessons. The learning content is current and was created by the committee or will include citations and permission to reuse will be obtained. Assessments are contained in each lesson and seek to check for understanding on the topics covered in that lesson. A course project contained in lesson 6 is cumulative, demonstrating mastery of the learning objectives covered throughout the course. Course technology included is the use of an LMS, videos, graphics/images, Microsoft Office applications, and interactive online tutorials.
  • Allows for local flexibility: All lessons were created with local flexibility in mind, both in content and course format delivery. Many LMS’s are used throughout the state and each college has different levels of instructional technology/design support. To accommodate all colleges we are delivering the content using a standard delivery system of PowerPoint slides. Text content is presented using Quality Matters standards and videos and assessments are easily accessible. Content can be added to an LMS as is or can be used in a more dynamic video-style presentation using local colors, logos and graphics. In some lessons, the content must be locally customized. For example, in lesson 2, Information Ethics, general information about recognizing and avoiding plagiarism is included with space holders for “Your institution's academic integrity statement/policy” and “If you need assistance” sections which will be unique to each institution. Additionally, lesson 5, Searching Library Databases, has content slots for “Institution-specific login information” and “List of institution databases”. Also, the order of the lessons can be tailored to an institution’s needs (see Wendy’s GCSC course).

Additional Comments/Concerns: When we started our work last fall, we were surprised to see how many variations there are of this course’s title and description among the 28 state college libraries. Perhaps this will be a great opportunity to encourage standardization throughout the state?

Committee Roster

Committee Members and Terms

3 Years (August 2016 – July 2019)

Karen Kaufmann
Seminole State College
kaufmannk@seminolestate.edu

Rayla Tokarz
Polk State College
rtokarz@polk.edu

Angie Neely-Sardon, Committee Co-Chair
Indian River State College
asardon@irsc.edu

Helene Gold, Committee Co-Chair
Tallahassee Community College
goldh@tcc.fl.edu

2 Years (August 2016 – July 2018)

Marian Smith
Eastern Florida State College
smithma@easternflorida.edu

Linda Reifler-Alessi
St. Petersburg College
Reifleralessi.linda@spcollege.edu

Kristen Jernigan
Polk State College
kjernigan@polk.edu

Wendy Dover
Gulf Coast State College
wdover@gulfcoast.edu

LRSC Liaisons (2017-18)

Lori Driscoll, LRSC Chair
Gulf Coast State College
ldriscoll@gulfcoast.edu

Courtlann Thomas, LRSC Liaison 
Polk State College
cthomas@polk.edu